The Barcodes Shop

The Barcodes Shop

The Barcodes Shop is a SCAM operating in a variety of different countries under a variety of names. We have detailed the websites we know of that are run by them at the bottom of this page. (also called Global Barcodes)

The Issues:

  • The Barcodes Shop represents that they sell barcodes that come directly from GS1 with country codes from a variety of different countries including the UK (50) as well as a whole bunch of other countries. While they are supplying these ’50’ numbers, it is illegal for them to be doing this, and it goes against the GS1 license agreements. There have been complaints that have been upheld by the UK and European advertising standards boards, however, even if the sites get removed, they will likely pop-up somewhere else quickly.
  • There is an array of misleading information on their websites. Largely in the FAQ Section here. The idea that they have been in business 35 years is absolutely ludicrous. There are also many false assurances through this FAQ that are simply untrue.
  • They are difficult to contact. While you may get a response via email before purchase, you are unable to call them and speak to a person on the phone. Furthermore, if you have any post purchase issues, they will quickly become very difficult to contact.
  • David O’Sowa seems to be the person behind these websites. It seems clear he is deliberately misleading customers and attempting to undermine the barcoding system. It may be best to avoid buying if you see his name mentioned anywhere.
  • The UK ASA (Advertising Standards Authority) and the European Advertising Standards Authority have both ruled on issues of false advertising on the Barcodes Shop websites – look here for the ruling of misleading advertising by the Barcodes Shop.
  • The Barcodes Shop is also listed on the UK ASA page of Non-compliant online advertisers.
  • False customer feedback. The “feedback” from customers on the Barcodes Shop sites is false – for example compare “I’ve just paid for the 100 units package and can’t begin to tell you how HAPPY I was to do so. The India Barcode Shop focus on privacy and security is increasingly important yet it is one of very, very few companies that is taking users concerns seriously. Thus I wish The India Barcode Shop much success!” by Kapil Singh, Manager – Export, Kirti Nagar, New Delhi on their India site with ““I’ve just paid for the 100 units package and can’t begin to tell you how HAPPY I was to do so. The Barcodes Shop focus on privacy and security is increasingly important yet it is one of very, very few companies that is taking users concerns seriously. Thus I wish The Barcodes Shop much success!” Simon Hazard, Birmingham on their UK site and “I’ve just paid for the 100 units package and can’t begin to tell you how HAPPY I was to do so. The Singapore Barcode Shop focus on privacy and security is increasingly important yet it is one of very, very few companies that is taking users concerns seriously. Thus I wish The Singapore Barcode Shop much success!”
    Somaline Koh, Manager – Export, Singapore on their Singapore site – blatant false claims that are repeated right down the pages – and it looks like these “testimonials are all stolen from another unrelated website.

On September 10, 2015, the EASA (European Advertising Standards Authority) issued a ruling against Global Barcodes, S.L. “The Barcodes Shop”. This ruling stated –

“On September 10th 2015, the Jury of Advertising has issued an Opinion on an advertisement of the company Global Barcodes, S.L.
The complaint was filed against an advertisement broadcasted on the Internet. The advertisement offered the purchase of barcodes in European countries indicating that it was an authorised dealer of EAN numbers. Such numbers had been issued by the American companies which were members of the Uniform Code Council before 28th August 2002. The advertisement also displayed several logos and trademarks, such as “ISO 9001”, “Barcodes Numbers Trade”, “Verisign. The Internet Trust Company”, y “Trust Online”.
The Jury concluded that the advertisement contained objective claims referred to the characteristics of the promoted products, such as the possibility of buying barcodes in the United Kingdom, or the inclusion of the logos mentioned above. The Jury understood that it could be deduced from those claims that the Advertiser had been reckoned by official accreditations. According to rule 23 of the Code of Advertising Practice, the advertiser must meet the burden of proof by submitting sufficient evidence in other to prove the truthfulness and accuracy of the advertisement. However, as the advertiser had not submitted any answer, the Jury concluded that the advertisement was misleading and breached the rule 14 of the Code of Advertising Practice. Likewise, as the advertisement was broadcasted on the Internet, it also breached the Article 3.1 of the Ethical Code of Confianza Online.”

The Websites

Thebarcodesshop.co.uk
laboutiquedesbarres.com
elranchodelasbarras.com
singaporebarcodeshop.com
thebarcodehouse.com
indiabarcodeshop.com
haibisognodiuncodiceabarre.com
latiendadelasbarras.com
deutschestrichcodes.com